Wednesday Weirdness Roundup: Detroit Bigfoot & a Possessed Mongoose

mongoose

“Your mother sucks c***s in hell!”

  • The tale of Gef, the talking mongoose, is by far one of the weirdest and stupidest incidents in the history of the paranormal. In the summer of 1931, a remote farmhouse on the Isle of Man was invaded by what initially seemed to be a pest animal. James Irving, who lived in the farmhouse with his wife and precocious 13-year-old daughter, Voirrey, took to sleeping with a shotgun in the hopes of killing the creature that wandered around in his walls and hissed at the family. But then the activity escalated to poltergeist-like incidents, and the animal in the walls began talking to James and Voirrey. It sang songs and answered questions in a high voice, speaking perfect English.
    At some point, this talking critter darted into view long enough to be identified as a mongoose. The Irvings named him “Gef”. Gef claimed he had been born in India 78 years earlier, indicating that he was some kind of spirit possessing the form of a mongoose. He could supposedly see things occurring at a distance, and knew things about people without being told. He was antagonistic much of the time, hiding in the walls of the farmhouse to taunt and threaten visitors. At other times he was almost kind, leaving dead rabbits and other tokens of affection for the Irvings.
    This ridiculous local spectacle caught the attention of the era’s most renowned ghosthunter, Harry Price, who wrote a book about Gef (The Haunting of Cashen’s Gap: A Modern “Miracle” Investigated, 1936) even though he didn’t witness any of Gef’s alleged psychic gifts.
    The solution to the mystery almost certainly lies with Voirrey. She was a bright, curious girl who just happened to be transitioning into womanhood – a common element in poltergeist cases. She enjoyed rabbit-hunting. Evidently a skilled ventriloquist, she could make people believe the insults they heard from the walls weren’t coming from her.
    The only remarkable thing about the Gef affair is how long it lasted: Over 14 years, a very long time for a poltergeist hoax. It ended abruptly in 1945, when James Irving died and Voirrey left Cashen’s Gap with her mother. Gef was never seen (or heard) again.
    Now, 83 years after his squeaky voice first issued from the walls, Gef is the focus of a symposium that will be held later this year at Senate House Library in London.
  • Is the beleaguered bitcoin a failed virtual currency…or a cult fetish? Maybe a little of both?
  • Some of my fondest childhood memories revolve around Gothic children’s TV series made in Britain: The Moondial, The Haunting of Barney Palmer, Into the Labyrinth. They all had a “this room is surrounded by film” quality, but who wouldn’t be creeped out by the intro for Children of the Stones? Fangoria has a fabulous rundown of other gems of British folk horror  on TV and film.
  • A Sasquatch squatting in a house in Detroit? Seems legit.

6 Comments

Filed under Bigfoot, Bizarre, Hoaxes, Impractical Jokes, Wednesday Weirdness Roundup

6 responses to “Wednesday Weirdness Roundup: Detroit Bigfoot & a Possessed Mongoose

  1. Sarah

    . I’ve found the Gef story fascinating, disturbing and hilarious in equal measure for ages – really enjoyed this write-up. Thanks for a fascinating and thought-provoking blog!

  2. How did I miss those Gothic children’s series? Were they on CBC? As for the Sasquatch…must belong to the Monster-On-The-Land movement…

    • PBS and Nickelodeon used to run them sporadically. Most are on DVD these days. Some, like The Haunting of Barney Palmer, were based on fantastic children’s lit that I would recommend to any age group (if you’re into that sort of thing).

  3. hey can you take a look at carolyn hamlett and her website beyond the physical?

  4. valgal

    When are you going to post a new article? I’m going through withdrawals!

  5. A Top 10 Stupidest/Weirdest Theories about Flight 370 is on the way.

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